Furnaces

Gas and oil furnaces provide warm, even heat throughout your home by circulating heated air through ducts.

How They Work
The heat is created by burning gas or oil inside your furnace. Hot gases that are created pass through curved metal tubing called a heat exchanger and then out of your home through a metal or plastic vent pipe. At the same time, the air that circulates through your home passes over the outside of the heat exchanger and takes on the heat from the hot metal. The warm air is then circulated through your home.

Quality
Purchasing a brand name that has a reputation for quality and reliability can save you headaches and extra expense down the road.

  • New Carrier furnaces, for example, undergo a rigorous series of quality tests and checks, during production, with many of the tests being performed on every unit – not just random samples.
  • We back every furnace in writing, with a 20-year or more limited warranty on the heat exchanger (the heart of the furnace) and a one-year limited warranty on the entire unit. Extended warranties are also available.

Two-speed furnaces
Two-speed furnaces can run on low speed up to 90% of the time, so they operate more quietly and run for longer periods of time than single-speed furnaces. Longer operating periods translate into fewer on/off cycles, fewer drafts and much smaller temperature swings — only one or two degrees instead of the four-degree swings common with single-speed furnaces. Plus, better air circulation helps prevent air “stratification” — warm air rising to the ceiling and cold air settling on the floor. In short, you get consistent, even heat throughout your home.

Variable-capacity furnaces
Variable-capacity furnaces provide the ultimate combination of comfort, efficiency and quiet performance. In addition to the benefits of two-speed furnaces, they offer “smart” motors than can monitor your home’s comfort needs and automatically adjust the volume and speed of air to provide the most efficient heating or cooling. They offer added electrical efficiency as well: the “smart” fan motors on Carrier’s variable-capacity furnaces use less electricity than a 100-watt light bulb. They operate so efficiently that they can actually increase the efficiency rating of your central air conditioning system and offer you added energy savings when you use continuous fan operation in any season.
Energy Efficiency
A furnace’s efficiency rating, or AFUE (Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency), tells you how efficiently the furnace uses fuel (gas or oil). In general, higher efficiency furnaces mean lower monthly operating costs for heating.

The government-mandated minimum AFUE rating for furnaces installed in new homes is 78%. In contrast, many furnaces manufactured before 1992 had AFUE ratings as low as 60%.

Higher efficiency furnaces offering AFUE ratings of 80%, 90%, or up to 96% are also available to help reduce monthly heating costs.

Payback
Usually, the higher the efficiency, the more expensive the inital cost of the furnace. But with our climate, you will probably see the higher cost of a high-efficiency furnace paid back through lower utility bills in a few short years. And, after the payback, you continue to save on your energy bills for the life of the system.

Fan Coils

Fan coils are the indoor component of Air Conditioners. They are a heat exchanger housed in a metal box. The heat
Exchanger cools the air circulating through it. In doing so it removes moisture, removing humidity from the house. The moisture is then condensed into water. The is then drained from the unit into the waste water system.

Heat Pumps

Heat pumps look and operate very much like air conditioners with the notable exception that they provide both heating and cooling. While heat pumps and air conditioners do require the use of some different components, they both operate on the same basic principles.

How They Work
Heat pumps and central air conditioners are “split systems,” which means that there is an outdoor unit and an indoor unit. The job of the heat pump or air conditioner is to transport heat either into or out of your home. The “vehicle” your system uses to carry the heat is called refrigerant.

For the cooling operation, air from your home passes through the indoor coil. Heat is absorbed from the indoor air and the resulting cooler air is ciruclated back into your home through your duct system. Heat from your home exits through the outdoor coil.

While it’s keeping you cool, your air conditioner or heat pump also works as an effective dehumidifier. The process is similar to what happens when moisture condenses on the outside of a glass of ice water on a hot, humid day.

For heating, a heat pump basically reverses the cooling process to warm your home during cold weather.

Where does a heat pump get the heat to warm your home when it’s cold outside? Even though 35 degree air may feel cold to humans, it actually contains a great deal of heat. A heat pump’s heat exchanger can squeeze heat out of cold air, then transfers that heat into your home with the help of a fan coil or a furnace, which circulates the warm air through your ducts.

Heat pumps are often installed with back-up electric resistance heat or a furnace to handle heating requirements when more heat is needed than the heat pump can efficiently extract from the air. Carrier also offers a Smart Heat accessory package that provides back-up electrical heat in stages. This option allows homeowners to enjoy the energy-saving benefits of a heat pump and still maintain comfortable indoor temperatures as outdoor temperatures gradually drop.

Quality
Purchasing a brand name that has a reputation for quality and reliability can save you headaches and extra expense down the road.

New Carrier air conditioners and heat pumps, for example, undergo 34 quality tests and checks during production, with more than 20 of these being performed on every unit not just on random samples. Llimited and extended warranties are available.

Two-Speed Units
Two-speed units can run on low speed (using 50% of the energy) up to 80% of the time, so they operate more quietly and run for longer periods of time than single-speed models. Longer operating periods translate into fewer on/off cycles, fewer drafts and much smaller temperature swings — only two or three degrees instead of the four-degree swings common with single-speed units. Plus, better air circulation helps prevent air “stratification” warm air rising to the ceiling and cold air settling on the floor. In short, you get consistent, even cooling throughout your home.

Multi-Speed Indoor Unit
If you purchase a multi-speed or variable-capacity furnace or fan coil with your unit, you will enhance both the comfort and the efficiency of your air conditioning or heat pump system even further.

Energy Efficiency

  • Cooling efficiency for air conditioners and heat pumps is indicated by a SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) rating, which tells you how efficiently the unit uses electricity.
  • Heat pumps also have heating efficiency ratings, indicated as an HSPF (Heating Seasonal Performance Factor).

In general, the higher the SEER or HSPF rating, the less electricity the unit will use to cool (or heat) your home. The government-mandated minimum efficiency standards for units installed in new homes at 10.0 SEER and 6.8 HSPF. Most air conditioners and heat pumps manufactured before 1992 had SEER ratings below 7.0 and HSPF ratings below 5.0.

Air conditioners and heat pumps manufactured today have SEER ratings that range from 10.0 to about 17. Heat pumps are available with HSPF ratings from about 6.8 to 10.0.

Payback
Usually, the higher the efficiency, the more expensive the unit. In our climate you are likely to see the higher cost of a high-efficiency air conditioner or heat pump paid back (through lower utility bills) in a few short years. And, after the payback, you continue to save on your energy bills for the life of the system.

Tips On Matching Indoor & Outdoor Coils
Your central air conditioning or heat pump system is a split system. That means it consists of two parts: an indoor unit (coil) and outdoor (condensing) unit. Both components are necessary for a working system. So if you install a new outdoor unit, be sure to include a new, equally efficient “matched” indoor unit.

If you don’t replace both your indoor and outdoor units, you won’t be getting what you paid for. In fact, your system could be up to 15% less efficient than stated — and you’ll be less comfortable, too. That’s why simply replacing just the outdoor unit isn’t a bargain in the long run.

Replacing the outdoor unit but leaving the old indoor unit may offer you the lowest price, but it won’t give you the best value. When your air conditioning or heat pump components don’t match, you’ll be sacrificing comfort. The system may still “work,” but it won’t perform up to the promised energy efficiency. Over time, this will cost you more money. When the components aren’t matched, it could create undue stress on your cooling system, resulting in unnecessary, premature failure.